Young Professional Breakfast

Loading Events

What do breakfast and prospect research have in common?

Much like breakfast is an essential part of your day, effective prospect research is crucial to the success of your fundraising campaigns.

Tuesday, Dec. 11, learn how to extend your giving strategies with the number one thing you should already be doing for prospect research during a breakfast provided by the AFP Cincinnati YP Committee.

PLUS, get insider knowledge about Philanthropy Cloud, a research tool created through a partnership between United Way and Salesforce.

Location: Kennedy Heights Art Center

6546 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45213

Register

Non-profit fundraising is based on a single, stable mission while political fundraising is often short-term and focused on one candidate, issue, or election cycle. Both nonprofit and political fundraising benefit from long-term donor relationships, which require the same skills for building and expanding networks to make fundraising goals.

Couldn’t make it to the September YP Happy Hour?

Speakers Raye Allen of Mount Saint Joseph University and Makenzie Williams of the Republican Party of Kentucky work at different ends of the fundraising spectrum. Both shared their best tips for making the most of networking events in spite of the distinctions between nonprofit and political fundraising.

Non-profit fundraising is based on a single, stable mission while political fundraising is often short-term and focused on one candidate, issue, or election cycle. Both nonprofit and political fundraising benefit from long-term donor relationships, which require the same skills for building and expanding networks to make fundraising goals.

Before

Come to an event prepared! Many events share an RSVP list, so find out ahead of time who will be in the room and identify your primary targets. Research any prospect’s background before approaching them at an event (e.g. affinity to the organization, five-year giving history, organization mission) and have a few questions prepared before starting a conversation.

During

Bring a notepad and arrive early so you can look at the attendee list, name tags, or seating charts for the event. When it is time to move into the room, take an indirect route to your target or table so you can greet others along the way.

Sit with your back to the speaker at a speaking event with round tables. This gives a view of the entire room without having to look over your shoulder. If you address the room, stand and turn to face the speaker and don’t forget to breathe!

After

Don’t be in a rush to leave – especially if you made a comment to the room during the event.

When exchanging business cards, follow up with an email in the next 24 hours (draft your follow-up emails ahead of time) and reference something you discussed.

If no response, send another email 2 weeks after the event and don’t be hesitant to pick up the phone!